Gordon food service store

Fast food news, reviews, and discussion

2008.06.15 19:41 Fast food news, reviews, and discussion

The /FastFood subreddit is for news, reviews, and discussions of fast food (aka quick-service), fast casual, and casual restaurants -- covering everything fast food from multinational chains, regional and local chains, independent and chain cafeterias and all-you-can-eat restaurants, independent and chain diners, independent hole-in-the-wall restaurants, convenience store and gas station prepared food, food trucks and food carts, the neighborhood taqueria, street vendors, etc.
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2013.03.26 05:19 Bitcoin Canada Subreddit

Let's talk about Bitcoin in Canada
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2008.12.19 22:36 Huntsville, Alabama

A subreddit for the Rocket City.
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2023.06.03 15:53 catharsays [FOR HIRE] $450/mo VA services

Hi,
I'm Ana, offering my remote assistance to streamline your business and ensure you're on top of your game for $450 for 40 hrs/mo (additional hours are negotiable). Listed below are the services I offer:
For any services you need that aren't mentioned above, just hit me up (DM) so I can share my resume and discuss your needs. Cheers!
submitted by catharsays to freelance_forhire [link] [comments]


2023.06.03 15:53 88_phoenix_88 Pinoli

Have any of you been to Pinoli yet? I'm watching a spot Kare 11 bit about them right now. Curious if their food is good...service etc..
While I'm at it what is everyone's favorite Italian restaurant in the area ?
submitted by 88_phoenix_88 to Minneapolis [link] [comments]


2023.06.03 15:52 Travelona_budget Airplane & Airport Travel Hacks

Hey, fellow wanderers! Buckle up and get ready for a wild ride as I share the incredible tale of Betty and Tom, a vibrant couple who turned their airport adventures into epic travel hacks. Let me take you on their exhilarating journey through the clouds, where they discovered ingenious ways to make the most of their time in the air and at the airport.
Betty, a spirited 40-year-old, and Tom, a witty 45-year-old, had been happily married for 15 years. They were known amongst their friends as the ultimate travel enthusiasts, always seeking new destinations and exciting experiences. When they approached me for advice, they were eager to find innovative ways to navigate airports and make their flights more enjoyable.
After getting to know their travel preferences, I recommended a few hacks that would transform their airport experiences forever. First, I suggested they join an airline rewards program. By signing up, they gained access to exclusive perks like priority boarding and access to airport lounges, making their pre-flight experience comfortable and stress-free.
Next, I introduced them to the magic of packing cubes. These nifty little organizers helped Betty and Tom optimize their luggage space and keep their belongings neatly sorted. They no longer wasted precious time rummaging through their suitcases, which meant more time for exploring their destinations.
To save time and bypass long security lines, I advised them to apply for TSA PreCheck. This expedited screening program allowed Betty and Tom to breeze through security checkpoints, keeping the hassle to a minimum. They were now able to spend their pre-flight moments relaxing at the gate or grabbing a delicious snack.
But the hacks didn't stop there. Betty and Tom became pros at finding the best deals on flights. They subscribed to fare-alert services and were always on the lookout for flash sales and discounted tickets. With their newfound knowledge, they managed to book incredible flights at jaw-dropping prices, allowing them to travel more frequently and explore further corners of the globe.
Armed with their travel hacks, Betty and Tom embarked on countless adventures, transforming their airport experiences into moments of excitement and anticipation. They even discovered some hidden gems within airports, such as quiet relaxation areas and secret food spots, thanks to their meticulous research.
TL;DR: Betty and Tom, a dynamic couple with 15 years of marriage under their belt, turned to their trusty travel consultant (that's me!) for airport and airplane travel hacks. Through joining rewards programs, using packing cubes, obtaining TSA PreCheck, and staying on top of flight deals, they transformed their airport experiences into stress-free and enjoyable adventures. Their newfound knowledge and savvy helped them explore the world while keeping their budget intact.
If you're eager to learn more awesome travel hacks and want to travel on a budget like Betty and Tom, check out my YouTube video "Airplane & Airport Travel Hacks" on my channel, Travel on a Budget. Get ready to elevate your travel game and make every journey a remarkable one!
[Link to your YouTube video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1_nA50wxhII]
submitted by Travelona_budget to TravelNursing [link] [comments]


2023.06.03 15:51 catharsays [FOR HIRE] $450/mo VA services

Hi,
I'm Ana, offering my remote assistance to streamline your business and ensure you're on top of your game for $450 for 40 hrs/mo (additional hours are negotiable). Listed below are the services I offer:
For any services you need that aren't mentioned above, just hit me up (DM) so I can share my resume and discuss your needs. Cheers!
submitted by catharsays to VirtualAssistant [link] [comments]


2023.06.03 15:51 Adorable_Kitten100 I don't feel like I'm treated fairly...

Hi, I'm a 28 year old who works at a bakery and I basically serve the product, and customer service. Apologies in advance for the long post but it's also venting. I have an afternoon manager that makes my job a bit more stressful than needed but I also don't know if I may be overreacting, so thought this would be a good place to share.
Anyways, I do enjoy my job (been there for 1 year and 8 months so far), it's better than my first job and pays better, but my current job is paying me $14 an hour at the moment. Even my other co-workers who have been there longer years don't get paid much more or about the same, which is a problem in itself. I've been working roughly 4 days a week so I don't get burned out too fast from dealing with customers. It's not that hard of a job, which I enjoy but my afternoon manager isn't helping me feel any better.
We'll call my afternoon manager Dila and she's 60 years old (but doesn't look it). I just get this feeling like Dila treats me differently than the other co-workers. Dila became afternoon manager after I was already working there. Our previous afternoon manager trained me and I enjoyed working with her, but she left because she worked there for a lot of years and wanted to move on to something else. Anyway, Dila acted just fine with me and friendly in the beginning, but lately it's just been different and I have no idea why. I don't even know if she's just let all the power go to her head or not either.
Dila is talkative with my other co-workers and jokes with them, but with me now, I feel like I'm just "there" to her...just an extra person or just not there at all. Sometimes it also feels like Dila doesn't even like working with me, because when I mentioned I planned to reduce my hours a bit after my husband finally got a job offer, she said "Good. So the other co-workers can have their hours back". Like it's my fault that I needed to work a bit more just so my husband and I could have a bit more money to help us, while he tried to find something. We weren't even expecting him to get layed off, it happened out of the blue. I even have my moments where I'm a bit forgetful or make silly mistakes, but no one's perfect! But seems like because of that, Dila doesn't seem to trust me...so she double checks orders I take, questions me on things, and even asks me what certain phone calls were about, whether I was on the phone with a customer or one of the other stores.
Sure she may be just trying to do the best she can with her job and make sure things are going smoothly and there aren't too many mistakes, but I feel like I'm being babysat sometimes...and I already have low self-esteem as it is so that's not helping me feel like I'm doing as good of a job as the others. She's even complimented other co-workers before, but I've rarely ever get that.
I've always been nice and respectful, and I get along with all the other co-workers (they're like friends or a second family to me)...I even invited them to my wedding! Dila was too but she couldn't go because of some other obligation. I would talk to Dila about my feelings but I just don't want to risk starting any drama...because she's taken what I've said about something the wrong way before. Plus I'm very introverted and not forward like that.
It also seemed like I was the only one she was telling to do stuff, even certain things that I never thought I would have to do. For example, washing pans/trays in the big dishwashing machine we have (we do have a dishwasher but he's not here on Fridays). Course I'm all for helping him out but I haven't seen any other co-workers do that. She even taught me how to clean out the dishwasher (said I should know how to after working there a year), and when I asked her if any of the other co-workers knew how to clean it, she said "I don't know"...and most of them have been here longer than I have and they don't know how? Shouldn't they then?
My husband even recently wrapped my car in a pretty color and everyone complimented it, except Dila. She said nothing about it. BUT at one point Dila took me aside when I came into work one day and we talked things out. She asked if I had a problem with her (which I didn't, I thought she did with me). She told me that she doesn't want me to think she's picking on me, that she's trying to help me grow within the company and to get into a routine of doing stuff myself without having to be told. That she's giving me different things to do so I'm not bored doing the same stuff everytime I work. After we talked, we hugged and I thought everything would be fine between us, and I would do better at what she said as it made sense and something I could improve on with this job anyway. She said I was excellent on the closing routine, just not during the day when I come in.
BUT yesterday I felt picked on again by her. I've seen other co-workers on their phones before...not often but I have seen it. I'm not even on my phone at all unless I'm messaging my husband about something or another co-worker. We know better to not do it in front of customers and to be out of sight, and if there isn't anyone in the bakery, what's the big deal if we're doing it for a few minutes? I was asking one of our main managers (we'll call her Patty) a question, about if we were going to get anything in for Pride month and Dila caught me messaging. I told her I was messaging Patty and asking her something. She didn't seem to mind? I sent the message and when I was able to reply back to Patty, Dila caught me again and then took me aside.
She told me I can't be using my phone unless I'm on break (which I never take unless I need to), and that I can only use my phone if it's an emergency. That I could be doing other things instead around the bakery. She said that's what she was told by Patty and there was even something posted about it, which I don't think I saw? Only thing I saw was that you can keep your phone on you or nearby if it's on silent. Dila told me that she's put up with me being on my phone for long enough. I really wonder if she would have acted this way with any of the other co-workers besides me if they were in my shoes. And this may be a rule with other retail places but why is this becoming a big deal to her now...just because the higher ups supposedly said something? BUT when Patty has come in to fill in for someone, I've seen her on her phone more often than we have been. Either way, I personally don't see the big deal as I don't even do it that often and even if I am messaging someone, it doesn't even take me long... Besides, there's only so much stuff you can keep cleaning, or stocking, etc. over and over again.
After Dila finished talking to me, one of my friend co-workers came around the corner to put something away and wondered what was going on, and I told her the main points, and she rolled her eyes. She's the only one at the moment who sees how Dila has been treating me. But it's no one's place to do anything about it. If it still continues to be like this, I may try to get a different job. I reallyyy don't want to or should have to, but hopefully I could find something that could pay me better anyway.
Anyway, thanks for reading! Rant over.
submitted by Adorable_Kitten100 to retailhell [link] [comments]


2023.06.03 15:49 CaboWabo7 Question about AWS services & charges

I wanted to ask about each of the AWS services in the attached image and if the charges make sense. I asked my developers to give me a detailed description of each and I wanted to see if I could get more information to make sure it all checks out as well as learn more about what each of these services are and how they work.
If it helps, in April we were charged $480 and the $533 is for May. We're releasing a mobile game in a couple weeks and aside from our developers, we've had about 10-15 people download and try the game (from Google play store only).
Please feel free to ask me any questions that could help me understand the services and charges more.
Thanks in advance!
https://preview.redd.it/kgeh1g2c4t3b1.png?width=1573&format=png&auto=webp&s=202113d987ec388adfad83856a82c434a27aa72a
submitted by CaboWabo7 to aws [link] [comments]


2023.06.03 15:46 SwoopingMoth Any small businesses have luck with TikTok Shop?

Just like every TikTok program, there’s infuriatingly little info available about TikTok Shop. Can you easily sync it to a Shopify store so that the product quantities are updated automatically? Does TikTok Shop generate a shipping label/packing slip for you or do you have to manually do it through another shipping service? What kind of fees is TikTok taking out of the sales?
Hoping some people who’ve used it can weigh in!
submitted by SwoopingMoth to Tiktokhelp [link] [comments]


2023.06.03 15:44 bullyreece SSCP Passed in just over a week

Hey All!
Somehow managed to pass the SSCP exam in just over a week of study and the total exam time was 2 hours for me so had a lot of room to spare! I started learning the material on Wednesday on 24/05/23 then passed on Saturday 03/06/23!! Here’s my story.
Background :
I’ve worked only as a service desk analyst for almost 3 years. 1 of which being internal and 1 and a bit being at a MSP. I’m currently 1st line however I’m the 2nd point of contact who primarily deals with break/fix including server support. Our coords and apprentices deal with most of the password resets, 365 admin, email release/whitelist/blacklist and in general the basic tickets. Stuff that lands on our 1st line desk does feel overly technical sometimes for what I feel a 1st desk should be but that’s a different conversation and even then I do appreciate the knowledge I’ve gained.
I only officially hold the A+ and AZ900, but through a traineeship I done a few years ago, I essentially informally studied a lot of material (Net,Sec,ITIL, etc) through them to land that first job.
I’ve never been good at studying it would always stress me out and bore me. I’ve been recently diagnosed with ADHD but now have access to medication and boy was that a game changer! I can just manually choose what I hyperfocus on. It’s actually crazy.
Study Plan:
I watched and created a word document of notes and screenshots through the SSCP course on ITProTV with Adam Gordon - Really liked the guy, can see the enthusiasm he has. My plan was 1 Domain each day of just the videos and writing the notes/screenshotting adams notes and putting them in this word document - I did not go back through after watching all the videos of a domain. I called it there and done something else to unwind.
Once all I watched through all 7 of the domains, I printed everything out and highlighted things, adding notes and crappy hand-drawn diagrams to simplify complex subjects. Anything I wanted a bit more depth in, I just googled. I also put *’s on pages I thought I’d apply a bit more focus on.
This got me to Friday, where I just read back through everything over and over again. Only really paying attention to what I’ve wrote and what I’ve highlighted. I wrote a lot of rhetorical questions to basically ask myself and think logically as to why we do this a certain way, breaking it all down.
In terms of mock tests… I didn’t do any, the quizzes and the official app I found were asking questions in such bizarre ways and in some cases I strongly believe weren’t even correct. Perhaps they were using an older curriculum… The app threw out a question about fire extinguishers and by that point I gave up with it and thought I’ll stick to my notes. As the mocks were making me think I’m destined to fail…
Study time, was at minimum 5 hours each day and with the Friday around 6-7 - So I went hard.
Additional Information
If I could give you a tip to pass; understand the concepts, don’t memorise them. The questions rely on logic and knowledge. If you’re able to get a 50/50 on a question, think logically about what would make more sense and achieve a certain purpose given the scenario of the question.
I want to clarify - I 100% thought I was failing this, maybe I got lucky with the questions or maybe I underestimated myself but either way - I’m glad this is out the way. I’m going to take a week and then just get the Net+ - I studied this before at the traineeship, so probably just a few videos and quizzes. I don’t think my study will need to be as intense 🤣
And lastly… seeing people’s pass times on Reddit made me shit myself as I couldn’t find anyone who was mental enough to try this- but here you go; I can confirm that it is possible to pass the SSCP exam in just over 1 week. So don’t panic if you’re in the same shoes I was prior to passing
submitted by bullyreece to SSCP [link] [comments]


2023.06.03 15:44 No-Audience679 i’m scared to get out

hi, im gonna get straight to the point. im a minor (teenager) (they/them/he) in the uk trying to figure out everything and how to get out of my home situation dealing with a narcissistic parent safely. i’m using a throwaway for this for my own privacy.
i know this is subreddit essentially built for venting and talking about triggering subjects but im gonna give a brief trigger warning:
tw for: medical neglect, emotional neglect, manipulation, emotional abuse, general neglect of needs, narcissistic parents, physical abuse, derogatory language (most of these mentions will be fairly brief)
alright with that out of the way im gonna give a brief context on everything and then get into my concerns/anxieties a little deeper. if any of these are triggering you can skip past this next part to the very bottom with the concerns/anxieties.
i have lived with my father for almost 3 years now (3 years in around july-august). my mum left to go back to my home country and has only visited about 2-3 times since and only messages on the rare occasion. my parents split when i was very young and i lived with her in a lone parent household for a majority of my life (besides the brief periods of my life where she was with someone). she was also abusive, though mostly emotionally and sometimes even physically. she was also a narcissist and has caused many issues for me and my family.
when she left and i moved in with my dad i thought it would be a relief and i would finally be able to live a normal life where i was respected and cared for… boy was i wrong!
my dad constantly shuts himself in his room and refuses to speak to me (he has previously not interacted with me for days in a row), has refused to get me medical care (such as a time where i had an infected tooth that needed desperate treatment to which he completely downplayed and ignored despite my constant asking for a dentist), yells and berates me when at home/when alone when i confront him about his behaviour (such as using me as a scapegoat/as an excuse for his crappy behaviour, and possibly even talking shit about me to his friends (something my mother also loves to do)) and then acts like the poor innocent in public/infront of guests, calls me names when angry, doesn’t feed me/make sure ive eaten/make food unless i ask him to, leaves me home alone at night for hours at end even after ive called him at least twice telling him im feeling anxious (i don’t particularly live in a nice/safe area, and i also suffer with an anxiety disorder) and that its nearing midnight (he literally just does not care), and generally is very emotionally unavailable and manipulative. the list could go on.
living with him has made me feel unsafe (i constantly feel as if i’m home alone even if he is just next door to me, also his manipulative behaviour and emotional distance) and unloved. i am so very sick and tired of feeling like this and getting mistreated, but i’m hesitant to reach out and get help.
i worry that he’ll react poorly and use my neurodivergancies and my disorders against me, or try to manipulate the picture that he is the poor innocent and i’m the disgusting pig child ruining his life. this fear is making it much harder for me to find the courage to reach out.
not only that, but i fear that once i reach out to social services that things will feels much less within my control and i have no certainty what will happen next. whilst i am open to having some sort of help being put in place in my home, what i truly want is to escape this house. so i’m not anxious about the possibility of being taken away. but its just the general unknowing of the future which is holding me back. though i have a full understanding that leaving this house is completely a life saving decision.
i’m just feeling very anxious, if anyone has any advice that can help calm my fears or at least give me some perspective or a better understanding, anything will be appreciated.
thank you so much for reading.
submitted by No-Audience679 to abusiveparents [link] [comments]


2023.06.03 15:43 Kimingwriter Post-CAPTION RULES that’ll get clients exploding your inbox as an unknown and new trainer in the area (copywriter’s tips), the way to get people to DM you for a change.

If you’re blasting posts 10 times a week… and tried every idea AI gives you but still wake up to an empty inbox and ZERO impressions in the morning.
Then here is caption guidelines to keep in mind when writing a winning caption for the post you worked so hard on.
I’m sorry but NOONE cares about YOUR SERVICES until you FIGURE this OUT.
How do the top fitness influencers rise to the top? It’s not because they know anything more than you… Or because they’re one of god’s favorites. It’s simply because they follow the end-of-week kindergarten tradition, Show not tell. For example, Jeff Nippard is known as THE GUY for science-based workouts and Chris Heria is THE GUY for calisthenics because they show it – not say it. Jeff shows it through his detailed research and Chris does it through his workout videos.
Now where am I going with this and how does it relate to writing a caption that forces people to pay attention? Well, you need to show what you’re offering before saying what it is (if you even say it at all – links to the next rule). NOONE CARES – and I mean NOONE – will care about your services until you’ve shown that (A) you can provide value specifically for their problems/desires and (B) you’ve PROVEN that you can provide actual value for them. I understand niching down to a more specific audience can seem to limit, especially since you have no clients yet, but if you want to show that you can help them. The best way is to cater to a specific problem or desire that your service can provide the solution for.
A rule of thumb for finding what problems and desires you can target is to (1) ask people you know who are of that target market, (2) go on FB or IG and see what people around your area are saying, or (3) go on google maps to local gyms review and see what people are saying. Although there are hundreds of other ways you can research people’s problems and desires, those are the three off the top of my head.
You’re KILLING every glimmer OF HOPE for them to be CURIOUS & INTERESTED
Linking back to showing before telling, you don’t want to tell everything there is to know about the service you’re advertising for the post. Sure tease a few mechanics on what type of training it uses, but NEVER tell everything there’s to know about it. When you tell EVERYTHING, you kill the main driving motives for them to personally reach out to them. Which if you haven’t figured out, is curiosity and the burning desire to learn something new. Why do you think back in 3rd grade wherever there was a secret floating around the room, everybody wanted in? IT’S BECAUSE HUMANS WANT TO KNOW THINGS. Especially if it can benefit their lives in some way. So be sure to never-ever reveal everything your service has in store and replace it with a CTA instead.
Another big curiosity-killer is mundane and unlogical mechanisms. As I said, you don’t want to include everything but enough to make it believable and presented in a way that’ll be exciting. Don’t worry I’ll tackle both one by one. First, believability is pretty basic and easy to understand. Is your solution cardio when they’re trying to gain muscle? Second, excitement. You need to present your mechanism in a way that sounds new and interesting. This could be adding a twist to something that already exists or just coming up with a name that relates to it. Then you need to add a SPECIFIC benefit that’ll come as a result of the mechanism. For example (with both excitement and benefit shown), “...decline Push-EXPLODE movements that’ll have your chest ready to erupt like an active volcano”. Something that’ll sound interesting and make them want to reach out or ask questions to learn more.
Anyway, those are the few guidelines you can use to force unanswered questions in the reader's mind and make them DM for more. I hope you can find use in this and start filling out your schedule and testimonial. Again, any questions or comments you have can be left in the comments or private DMs.
submitted by Kimingwriter to u/Kimingwriter [link] [comments]


2023.06.03 15:43 Altruistic-Cow203 What solids are you feeding your baby?

Baby is 6mo. We started him on Beechnut, then I read about the heavy metal counts in Gerber, Beechnut and Happy Baby. Found out about cerebelly and serenity kids and eagerly wanted to switch to them! Problem is they are all multiple ingredients. Our ped recommended only introducing one food at a time and getting the purées that only have singular food + water. The only ones I can find in store like this are beechnut and gerber . I don’t know what to feed him and am super confused. Store bought works best for us.
I am not interested in making our own food because I am already highly overwhelmed and have little time to take care of myself. I know everyone says its easy but even introducing solids had been a lot extra to my routine. Baby only sleeps in my arms which keeps me up all night. I’m on with him probably 18-20 hours / day. If husband takes him I’m doing missed chores. Send help 😭.
submitted by Altruistic-Cow203 to NewParents [link] [comments]


2023.06.03 15:41 Kimingwriter Post-CAPTION RULES that’ll get clients exploding your inbox as an unknown and new trainer in the area (copywriter’s tips), the way to get people to DM you for a change.

If you’re posting 10 times a week… and tried every idea AI gives you but still wake up to an empty inbox and ZERO impressions in the morning.
Then here is caption guidelines to keep in mind when writing a winning caption for the post you worked so hard on.
I’m sorry but NOONE cares about YOUR SERVICES until you FIGURE this OUT.
How do the top fitness influencers rise to the top? It’s not because they know anything more than you… Or because they’re one of god’s favorites. It’s simply because they follow the end-of-week kindergarten tradition, Show not tell. For example, Jeff Nippard is known as THE GUY for science-based workouts and Chris Heria is THE GUY for calisthenics because they show it – not say it. Jeff shows it through his detailed research and Chris does it through his workout videos.
Now where am I going with this and how does it relate to writing a caption that forces people to pay attention? Well, you need to show what you’re offering before saying what it is (if you even say it at all – links to the next rule). NOONE CARES – and I mean NOONE – will care about your services until you’ve shown that (A) you can provide value specifically for their problems/desires and (B) you’ve PROVEN that you can provide actual value for them. I understand niching down to a more specific audience can seem to limit, especially since you have no clients yet, but if you want to show that you can help them. The best way is to cater to a specific problem or desire that your service can provide the solution for.
A rule of thumb for finding what problems and desires you can target is to (1) ask people you know who are of that target market, (2) go on FB or IG and see what people around your area are saying, or (3) go on google maps to local gyms review and see what people are saying. Although there are hundreds of other ways you can research people’s problems and desires, those are the three off the top of my head.
You’re KILLING every glimmer OF HOPE for them to be CURIOUS & INTERESTED.
Linking back to showing before telling, you don’t want to tell everything there is to know about the service you’re advertising for the post. Sure tease a few mechanics on what type of training it uses, but NEVER tell everything there’s to know about it. When you tell EVERYTHING, you kill the main driving motives for them to personally reach out to them. Which if you haven’t figured out, is curiosity and the burning desire to learn something new. Why do you think back in 3rd grade wherever there was a secret floating around the room, everybody wanted in? IT’S BECAUSE HUMANS WANT TO KNOW THINGS. Especially if it can benefit their lives in some way. So be sure to never-ever reveal everything your service has in store and replace it with a CTA instead.
Another big curiosity-killer is mundane and unlogical mechanisms. As I said, you don’t want to include everything but enough to make it believable and presented in a way that’ll be exciting. Don’t worry I’ll tackle both one by one. First, believability is pretty basic and easy to understand. Is your solution cardio when they’re trying to gain muscle? Second, excitement. You need to present your mechanism in a way that sounds new and interesting. This could be adding a twist to something that already exists or just coming up with a name that relates to it. Then you need to add a SPECIFIC benefit that’ll come as a result of the mechanism. For example (with both excitement and benefit shown), “...decline Push-EXPLODE movements that’ll have your chest ready to erupt like an active volcano”. Something that’ll sound interesting and make them want to reach out or ask questions to learn more.
Anyway, those are the few guidelines you can use to force unanswered questions in the reader's mind and make them DM for more. I hope you can find use in this and start filling out your schedule and testimonial. Again, any questions or comments you have can be left in the comments or private DMs.
submitted by Kimingwriter to u/Kimingwriter [link] [comments]


2023.06.03 15:38 obeliskposture Short story about bad times & bad jobs

I've shared fiction here before and it didn't go altogether too poorly, so I'm going to press my luck and do it again. This was written about a year ago, and I'm tired of trying to peddle it to lit magazines. Might as well share it here, know that it met a few eyeballs, and have done with it.
It's relevant to the sub insofar as it's about urban alienation and the working conditions at a small business run by IN THIS HOUSE WE BELIEVE people. (I tried to pitch it as a story of the great resignation with a momentary flicker of cosmic horror.) It's based on a similar job I took on after getting laid off during the lockdown, and the circumstances of the main character's breakup are faintly similar to one I went through several years back (her job sucked the life out of her).
Without further ado:
* * *
It was getting close to midnight, and the temperature outside was still above 80 degrees. We’d locked up the shop at 10:15 and walked over to Twenty, the dive bar on Poplar Street, where a single wall-mounted air conditioner and four wobbly ceiling fans weren’t putting up much resistance against the July heat baking the place from the outside and the dense mass of bodies giving it a stifling fever from within.
Just now I came close to saying it was a Wednesday night, because that was usually when the cyclists descended upon Avenue Brew, the gritty-but-bougie craft beer and sandwich shop I was working at back then. Every Wednesday between March and November, about fifteen to twenty-five Gen Xers dressed in skintight polyester, all packages and camel toes and fanny packs, locked up their thousand-dollar bikes on the sidewalk and lined up for IPAs and paninis. They reliably arrived around 8:00, an hour before we closed, making it impossible to get started on the closing checklist and leave on time at 10:00. The worst of them were demanding and rude, and even the best got raucous and stubborn after a couple drinks. There were nights when bringing in the sidewalk tables couldn’t be done without arguing with them. Most were sub-par tippers, to boot.
After Wednesday came and went that week without so much as a single 40-something in Ray Bans and padded shorts stopping in to double-fist two cans of Jai Alai, we dared to hope the cyclists had chosen another spot to be their finish line from there on out. But no—they’d only postponed their weekly ride, and swarmed us on Friday night instead.
I was the last person to find out; I was clocked in as purchaser that evening. The position was something like a promotion I'd received a year earlier: for twenty hours a week, I got to retreat from the public and sit in the back room with the store laptop, reviewing sales and inventory, answering emails from brewery reps, and ordering beer, beverages, and assorted paper goods. When I put in hours as purchaser, my wage went up from $11 to $15 an hour, but I was removed from the tip pool. On most days, tips amounted to an extra two or three dollars an hour, so I usually came out ahead.
This was back in 2021. I don't know what Avenue Brew pays these days.
Anyway, at about 8:15, I stepped out to say goodbye to everyone and found the shop in chaos. Friday nights were generally pretty active, the cyclists' arrival had turned the place into a mob scene. The line extended to the front door. The phone was ringing. The Grubhub tablet dinged like an alarm clock without a snooze button. Danny was on the sandwich line and on the verge of losing his temper. Oliver was working up a sweat running food, bussing tables, and replenishing ingredients from the walk-in. The unflappable Marina was on register, and even she seemed like she was about to snap at somebody.
What else could I do? I stayed until closing to answer the phone, process Grubhub orders, hop on and off the second register, and help Danny with sandwich prep. After the tills were counted out, I stayed another hour to take care of the dishes, since nobody had a chance to do a first load. Oliver was grateful, even though he grumbled about having to make some calls and rearrange Sunday's schedule so I could come in a couple hours late. Irene and Jeremy, Avenue Brew's owners, would kick his ass if he let me go into overtime.
Danny suggested that we deserved a few drinks ourselves after managing to get through the shift without killing anyone. Not even Marina could find a reason to disagree with him.
The neighborhood had undergone enough gentrification to support an upscale brunch spot, an ice cream parlor, a gourmet burger restaurant, a coffee and bahn mi shop, and Avenue Brew (to name a few examples), but not yet quite enough that the people who staffed them couldn’t afford to live within a ten-minute walk from the main avenue where all these hep eateries stood between 24-hour corner stores with slot machines in back, late-night Chinese and Mexico-Italian takeout joints with bulletproof glass at the counters, and long-shuttered delis and shoe stores. Twenty on Poplar was the watering hole set aside for people like us. It was dim, a bit dilapidated, and inexpensive, and usually avoided by denizens of the condos popping up on the vacant lots and replacing clusters of abandoned row houses.
When we arrived, Kyle waved us over. He didn’t work at Avenue Brew anymore, but still kept up with a few of us. He was at Twenty at least four nights out of the week.
So there we all were. I sat with a brooding stranger freestyling to himself in a low mumble on the stool to my left and Oliver on my right, who tapped at his phone and nursed a bottle of Twisted Tea. To Oliver’s right sat Marina, staring at nothing in particular and trying to ignore Danny, who stood behind her, closer than she would have liked, listening to Kyle explain the crucial differences between the Invincible comic book and the Invincible web series.
I recall being startled back to something like wakefulness when it seemed to me that the ceiling had sprouted a new fan. I blinked my eyes, and it wasn’t there anymore. It reminded me of an incident from when I was still living with my folks in South Jersey and still had a car, and was driving home from a friend’s house party up in Bergen County. It was 6:30 AM, I hadn’t slept all night, and needed to get home so I could get at least little shuteye before heading to Whole Foods for my 11:00 AM shift. I imagined I passed beneath the shadows of overpasses I knew weren’t there, and realized I was dreaming at the wheel.
I was pretty thoroughly zombified at that point. Heather and I had broken up for good the night before, and I hadn't gotten even a minute of sleep. Calling out at Avenue Brew was tough. Unless you found someone willing to cover your shift on like six hours' notice, you were liable to get a writeup, a demotion, or your hours cut if you couldn't produce a doctor's note. So I loaded up on caffeine pills and Five-Hour Energy bottles at the corner store, and powered through as best I could.
I finished the last thimbleful of Blue Moon in my glass. Oliver wiped the sweat from the back of his neck with a napkin and covered his mouth to stifle a laugh at the KiwiFarms thread he was scrolling through. Pool balls clacked; somebody swore and somebody laughed. The TouchTunes box was playing Bob Dylan’s “Rain Day Woman #12 & 35,” and enough bleary 40-something men around the bar were bobbing their heads and mouthing the words to make it impossible to determine which one of them paid two bucks to hear it. A guy by the cigarette machine who looked like a caricature of Art Carney in flannel and an old Pixies T-shirt was accosting a woman who must have been a toddler when he hit drinking age, and she momentarily made eye contact with me as she scanned the area for a way out. Danny was shouting over the bartender’s head, carrying on a conversation with the Hot Guy from Pizza Stan’s, who was sitting on the horseshoe’s opposite arm.
I never got his name, but when Oliver first referred to him as the Hot Guy from Pizza Stan’s, I knew exactly who he meant. Philly scene kid par excellence. Mid-20s, washed-out black denim, dyed black hair, thick bangs, and dark, gentle eyes. He was only truly alluring when he was on the job, because he seldom smiled then—and when he smiled, he broke the spell by exposing his teeth, stained a gnarly shade of mahogany from too much smoking and not enough brushing.
“How’s Best? Marcus still a joker?” Danny asked him.
“Yeah, you know Marcus. You know how he is.”
So the Hot Guy had been working at Best Burger (directly across the street from Avenue Brew) ever since Pizza Stan’s owners mismanaged the place unto insolvency. (Afterwards it was renovated and reopened as a vegan bakery—which incidentally closed down about a month ago.) Danny used to work at Best Burger, but that ended after he got into a shouting match with the owner. I happened to overhear it while I was dragging in the tables and collecting the chairs from the sidewalk the night it happened. It wasn’t any of my business, and I tried not to pay attention, but they were really tearing into each other. A month later, Oliver welcomed Danny aboard at Avenue Brew. I hadn’t known he’d been interviewed, and by then it was too late to mention the incident. But I’d have been a hypocrite to call it a red flag after the way I resigned from my position as Café Chakra's assistant manager two years earlier—not that we need to go dredging that up right now. Let's say there was some bad blood and leave it at that.
Anyway, I was thinking about giving in and buying a pack of cigarettes from the machine—and then remembered that Twenty didn’t have a cigarette machine. I looked again. The Art Carney-lookalike was still there, fingering his phone with a frown, but the girl was gone—and so was the cigarette machine.
I had only a moment to puzzle over this before Danny clapped me on the shoulder and thrust a shot glass in front of me.
“Starfish!” he said. (Danny called me Starfish. Everybody else called me Pat.) “You look like you need some juice.”
He distributed shots to everyone else. Marina declined hers, but changed her mind when Kyle offered to take it instead.
She and Kyle had stopped sleeping together after Kyle left Avenue Brew to work at the Victory taproom on the Parkway, but Marina was still concerned about his bad habits, which Danny delighted in encouraging.
We all leaned in to clink our glasses. Before I could find an appropriate moment to ask Marina if I could bum a cigarette, she got up to visit the bathroom. Danny took her seat and bowed his head for a conspiratorial word with Kyle.
I watched from the corner of my eye and tried to listen in. Like Marina, I was a little worried about Kyle. He got hired at Avenue Brew around the same time I did, just before the pandemic temporarily turned us into a takeout joint. He was a senior at Drexel then, an English major, and sometimes talked about wanting to either find work in publishing or carve out a career as a freelance writer after graduating. But first he intended to spend a year getting some life in before submitting himself to the forever grind.
He read a lot of Charles Bukowski and Hunter Thompson. He relished the gritty and sordid, and had already been good at sniffing it out around the neighborhood and in West Philly before Danny introduced him to cocaine, casinos, strip clubs, and a rogue’s gallery of shady but fascinating people. (None were really Danny’s friends; just fellow passengers who intersected with the part of his life where he sometimes went to Parx, sometimes came out ahead, sometimes spent his winnings on coke, and sometimes did bumps at titty bars.) Kyle recounted these adventures with a boyish enthusiasm for the naked reality of sleaze, like a middle schooler telling his locker room buddies about catching his older brother in flagrante and seeing so-and-so body parts doing such-and-such things.
Marina hated it. She never said as much to me, but she was afraid that the template Kyle set for his life during his “year off” was in danger of becoming locked in. The anniversary of his graduation had already passed, and now here he was trying to convince Danny to contribute a couple hundred dollars toward a sheet of acid his guy had for sale. He wasn't doing much writing lately.
I was the oldest employee at Avenue Brew (as I write this I’m 37, but fortunately I don’t look it), and when Kyle still worked with us I felt like it was my prerogative to give him some advice. The longer he waited to make inroads, I once told him, the more likely he’d be seen as damaged goods by the publishing world. He needed to jam his foot in the door while he was still young.
I could tell the conversation bored him, and didn’t bring up the subject again.
The bartender took my glass and curtly asked if I’d like another drink.
“No thanks, not yet,” I answered.
She slid me my bill.
I missed the old bartender, the one she’d replaced. I forget her name, but she was ingenuous and energetic and sweet. Pretty much everyone had some sort of crush on her. Sometimes she came into Avenue Brew for lunch, and tipped us as well as we tipped her. Maybe three months before that night—Danny witnessed it—she suddenly started crying and rushed out the door. Everyone at the bar mutely looked to each other for an explanation. (Fortunately for Twenty, the kitchen manager hadn’t left yet, and picked up the rest of her shift.)
She never came back. None of us had seen her since. But drafts still had to be poured and bottlecaps pulled off, and now here was another white woman in her mid-twenties wearing a black tank top, a pushup bra, and a scrunchie, same as before. Twenty’s regulars grew accustomed to not expecting to see the person she’d replaced, and life went on.
“How’re you doing?” I asked Oliver, just to say something to somebody, and to keep my thoughts from wandering back to Heather.
“Just kind of existing right now,” he answered. His phone lay face-up on the counter. He was swiping through Instagram, and I recognized the avatar of the user whose album he hate-browsed.
“And how’s Austin been?” I asked.
“Oh, you know. Not even three weeks after getting over the jetlag from his trip back from the Cascades, he’s off touring Ireland.” He shook his head. “Living his best life.”
He’d hired Austin on a part-time basis in September. We needed a new associate when Emma was promoted to replace a supervisor who'd quit without even giving his two weeks. There was a whole thing. I'm having a hard time recalling the guy's name, but I liked him well enough. He was a good worker and he seemed like a bright kid, but he was—well, he was young. Naïve. One day he found Jeremy sitting in the back room with his laptop, and took advantage of the open-door policy to ask why the store manager and supervisors didn’t get health benefits or paid time off. Jeremy told him it "was being worked on," and that he couldn’t discuss it any further at that time. I understand the kid got argumentative, though I never knew precisely what was said.
Irene started visiting the shop a lot more often after that, almost always arriving when the kid was working. No matter what he was doing, she’d find a reason to intervene, to micromanage and harangue him, and effectively make his job impossible. A coincidence, surely.
It’s something I still think about. By any metric, Jeremy and Irene have done very well for themselves. They’re both a little over 40 years old. I remember hearing they met at law school. In addition to Avenue Brew, they own a bistro in Francisville and an ice cream parlor in Point Breeze. They have a house on the Blue Line, send their son to a Montessori school, and pull up to their businesses in a white Volkswagen ID.4. But whenever the subject of benefits, wages, or even free shift meals came up, they pled poverty. It simply couldn’t be done. But they liked to remind us about all they did to make Avenue Brew a fun place to work, like let the staff pick the music and allow Oliver and me to conduct a beer tasting once a day. They stuck Black Lives Matter, Believe Women, and Progress flag decals on the front door and windows, and I remember Irene wearing a Black Trans Lives Matter shirt once or twice when covering a supervisor's shift. None of the college students or recent graduates who composed most of Avenue Brew's staff could say the bosses weren't on the right team. And yet...
I'm sorry—I was talking about Austin. He was maybe 30 and already had another job, a “real” job, some sort of remote gig lucrative enough for him to make rent on a studio in the picturesque Episcopal church down the street that had been converted into upscale apartments some years back. Austin wasn’t looking for extra cash. He wanted to socialize. To have something to do and people to talk to in the outside world. He wanted to make friends, and all of us could appreciate that—but it’s hard to be fond of a coworker who irredeemably sucks at his job. Austin never acted with any urgency, was inattentive to detail, and even after repeated interventions from Oliver and the supervisors, he continued to perform basic tasks in bafflingly inefficient ways. Having Austin on your shift meant carrying his slack, and everyone was fed up after a few months. Oliver sat him down, told him he was on thin ice, and gave him a list of the areas in which he needed to improve if he didn’t want to be let go.
When Austin gave Oliver the indignant “I don’t need this job” speech, it was different from those times Danny or I told a boss to go to hell and walked out. Austin truly didn’t need it. He basically said the job was beneath him, and so was Oliver.
It got deep under Oliver’s skin. He did need the job and had to take it seriously, even when it meant being the dipshit manager chewing out a man four or five years his senior. He earned $18 an hour (plus tips when he wasn’t doing admin work), had debts to pay off, and couldn't expect to get any help from his family.
The important thing, though, the part I distinctly remember, was that Oliver was looking at a video of a wading bird Austin had recorded. An egret, maybe. White feathers, long black legs, pointy black beak. Austin must have been standing on a ledge above a creek, because he had an overhead view of the bird as it stood in the water, slowly and deliberately stretching and retracting its neck, eyeing the wriggling little shadows below. As far as the fish could know, they were swimming around a pair of reeds growing out of the silt. The predator from which they extended was of a world beyond their understanding and out of their reach.
The video ended. Oliver moved on to the next item: a photograph of the bird from the same perspective, with a fish clamped in its beak. Water droplets flung from the victim's thrashing tail caught the sunlight. And I remember now, I clearly remember, the shapes of like twelve other fish stupidly milling about the bird's feet, unperturbed and unpanicked.
Danny peered at Oliver’s phone and observed a resemblance between the bird—its shape and bearing, and the composition of the photograph—and a POV porn video shot from behind and above, and he told us so. Elaborately. He made squawking noises.
“And mom says I’m a degenerate,” Oliver sighed. “Can you practice your interspecies pickup artist shit somewhere else?” Oliver flicked his wrist, shooing Danny off, and held his phone in front of his face to signal that he was done talking.
Danny sagged a little on his stool and turned away. I sometimes felt bad for him. For all his faults, he had the heart of a puppy dog. He really did think of us as his tribe. There was nobody else who’d only ever answer “yes” when you asked him to pick up a shift, and he did it completely out of loyalty.
He was turning 29 in a week. I wondered how many people would actually turn out to celebrate with him at the Black Taxi. Kyle probably would—but even he regarded Danny more as a source of vulgar entertainment than a friend.
Then it happened again. When I turned to speak to Oliver, there’d been a pair of pool cues leaning side-by-side against the wall a few stools down. Now they were gone.
This time it might have been my imagination. Somebody passing by could have casually snatched them up and kept walking.
But a moment later I seemed to notice a second TouchTunes box protruding from the wall directly behind me. I let it be.
Marina returned from the bathroom. Danny rose and offered her back her seat with an exaggerated bow. Before she got settled, I asked if she’d like to step outside with me. She withdrew her pack of Marlboro Menthols from her canvas bag, which she left sitting on the stool to deter Danny from sitting back down.
Marina never minded letting me bum cigarettes from time to time. I couldn’t buy them for myself anymore; it’s a habit I could never keep under control, and was only getting more expensive. Like everything else in the world. About once a month I reimbursed her by buying her a pack.
The air out on the sidewalk was as hot as the air inside Twenty, but easier to breathe. After lighting up, Marina leaned against the bricks and sighed.
“I wish Oliver would fire Danny already and get it over with.”
I nodded. Marina rarely talked about anything but work.
“He sneaks drinks and doesn't think anyone notices he's buzzed,” she went on. “He steals so much shit and isn’t even a little subtle about it. He’s going to get Oliver in trouble. And he’s a creep.”
“Yeah,” I said. These were her usual complaints about Danny, and they were all true. “At least he’s better than Austin.”
“That’s a low bar.”
Three dirt bikes and an ATV roared down the lonely street, charging through stop sign after stop sign, putting our talk on hold.
“Remind me. You’ve got one semester left, right?” I asked after the noise ebbed.
“Yep.”
Marina was a marketing major at Temple. She’d had an internship during the spring semester, and her boss told her to give her a call the very minute she graduated. Her parents in central Pennsylvania couldn’t pay her rent or tuition for her, so she was a full-time student and a full-time employee at Avenue Brew. Her emotional spectrum ranged from "tired" to "over it." She’d been waiting tables and working at coffee shops since she was seventeen, had no intention of continuing for even a day longer than she had to, and feared the escape hatch would slam shut if she dallied too long after prying it open.
She’d considered majoring in English, like Kyle. She went for marketing instead. I couldn’t blame her.
“Are you okay?” she asked. “You’ve been kind of off all day.”
“I’m terrible.”
“Why?”
I gave dodgy answers, but she asked precisely the right follow-up questions to get me going about what happened with Heather the night before.
It was the new job. Before the pandemic, Heather worked as a server at a Center City bar and grill. (That's where I met her; we were coworkers for about a year, and then I left to work Café Chakra because it was quieter and closer to where I lived.) When the place closed its doors and laid everyone off during the lockdown, she got a stopgap job at the Acme on Passyunk, and hated it. Then in March, she found a bar-and-lounge gig in a ritzy hotel on Broad Street. Very corporate. Excellent pay, great benefits. Definitely a step up. But her new employers made Irene and Jeremy look like Bob and Linda Belcher by comparison. It was the kind of place where someone had recently gotten herself fired for leaving work to rush to the hospital after getting the news that her grandmother was about to be taken off life support, and not finding someone to come in and cover the last two hours of her shift.
Heather seldom worked fewer than fifty-five hours a week, and her schedule was even more erratic than mine. At least once a week she left the hotel at 1:00 or 2:00 AM and returned at 9:00 the next morning. Neither of us could remember the last time she’d had two consecutive days off, and it had been over a month since one of mine overlapped with one of hers. She’d spent it drinking alone at home. All she wanted was some privacy.
I’d biked to South Philly to meet her when she got home at 1:30. The argument that killed our relationship for good began around 2:30, when I complained that we never had sex anymore. Heather accused me of only caring about that, when she was so exhausted and stressed that her hair was falling out in the shower. Quit the job? She couldn’t quit. The money was too good. She had student loans, medical bills, and credit card debt, and for the first time in her life she could imagine paying it all off before hitting menopause.
So, yeah, I was cranky about our sex life being dead in the water. Say whatever you like. But at that point, what were we to each other? We did nothing together anymore but complain about work before one or both of us fell asleep. That isn’t a relationship.
She said my hair always smelled like sandwiches, even after bathing, and she was done pretending it didn’t turn her off. I told her she was one to talk—she always reeked of liquor. As things escalated, we stopped caring if her roommates heard us. “You want to be a father?” she shouted around 4:00 AM. “Making what you make? That poor fucking kid.”
We fought until sunrise, and I left her apartment with the understanding that I wouldn’t be coming back, wouldn’t be calling her ever again. I biked home and sat on the steps facing the cement panel that was my house’s backyard. After my phone died and I couldn’t anaesthetize myself with dumb YouTube videos or make myself feel crazy staring at the download button for the Tinder app, I watched the sparrows hopping on and off the utility lines for a while.
At 11:40 I went inside. One of my roommates was already in the shower, so the best I could do was put on a clean Avenue Brew T-shirt before walking to the shop and clocking in at noon to help deal with the lunch rush.
“That’s a lot,” Marina finally said. “Sorry.”
I don’t know what I was expecting her to say. She was sixteen years my junior, after all, and just a coworker. She didn’t need to hear any of this, and I definitely didn't need to be telling her. But who else was there to tell?
She’d already finished her cigarette. I still had a few puffs left. She went inside.
I decided to call it a night.
The second TouchTunes box was gone—naturally. Danny had taken my stool, and regarded my approach with a puckish you snooze you lose grin. I wasn’t going to say anything. I’d just pay my bill, give everyone a nod goodnight, and walk the five blocks back home.
And then Danny disappeared.
One second, he was there. The next—gone.
Danny didn’t just instantaneously vanish. Even when something happens in the blink of an eye, you can still put together something of a sequence. I saw him—I seemed to see him—falling into himself, collapsing to a point, and then to nothing.
You know how sometimes a sound is altogether inaudible unless you’re looking at the source—like when you don’t realize somebody’s whispering at you, and can then hear and understand them after they get your attention? I think that was the case here. I wouldn't have known to listen if I hadn't seen it happen. What I heard lingered for two, maybe three seconds, and wasn't any louder than a fly buzzing inside a lampshade. A tiny and impossibly distant scream, pitchshifted like a receding ambulance siren into a basso drone...
I don’t know. I don’t know for sure. I’m certain I remember a flash of red, and I have the idea of Danny’s trunk expanding, opening up as it imploded. A crimson flower, flecked white, with spooling pink stalks—and Danny’s wide-eyed face above it, drawn twisting and shrinking into its petals.
For an instant, Twenty’s interior shimmered. Not shimmered, exactly—glitched would be a better word. If you’re old enough to remember the fragmented graphics that sometimes flashed onscreen when you turned on the Nintendo without blowing on the cartridge, you’ll have an idea of what I mean. It happened much too fast, and there was too much of it to absorb. The one clear impression I could parse was the mirage of a cash register flickering upside-down above the pool table.
Not a cash register. The shape was familiar, but the texture was wrong. I think it was ribbed, sort of like a maggot. I think it glistened. Like—camo doesn’t work anymore when the wearer stops crouching behind a bush and breaks into a run. Do you get what I’m saying?
Nobody else seemed to notice. The pool balls clacked. A New Order track was playing on the TouchTunes box. A nearby argument about about Nick Sirianni continued unabated.
Finally, there was a downward rush of air—and this at least elicited a reaction from the bartender, who slapped my bill to keep it from sailing off the counter.
“Danny,” I said.
“Danny?” Kyle asked me quietly. His face had gone pale.
“Danny?” Oliver repeated in a faraway voice.
After a pause, Kyle blinked a few times. “You heard from him?”
“God forbid,” said Marina. “When he quit I was like, great, I can keep working here after all.”
“Oh, come on—”
“Kyle. Did I ever show you those texts he sent me once at three in the morning?” The color had returned to Oliver’s face.
“No, what did he say?”
Oliver tapped at his phone and turned the screen toward Kyle.
“Oh. Oh, jeez.”
“Right? Like—if you want to ask me something, ask me. You know? Don’t be weirdly accusatory about it…”
I pulled a wad of fives and ones from my pocket, threw it all onto the counter, and beelined for the exit without consideration for the people I squeezed through and shoved past on the way.
I heard Marina saying “let him go.”
I went a second consecutive night without sleep. Fortunately I wasn’t scheduled to come in the next day.
The schedule. It’s funny. Oliver was generally great at his job, and even when he wasn’t, I cut him a lot of slack because I knew Irene and Jeremy never gave him a moment’s peace. But I could never forgive him those times he waited until the weekend to make up and distribute the schedule. This was one of those weeks he didn’t get around to it until Saturday afternoon. When I found it in my inbox, Danny’s name wasn’t anywhere on it.
As far as I know, nobody who hadn’t been at Twenty that night asked what happened to him. We were a bit overstaffed as it was, and everyone probably assumed Danny was slated for the chopping block. The part-timers were, for the most part, happy to get a few additional hours.
Oliver abruptly quit around Labor Day after a final acrimonious clash with the owners. I never found out the details, and I never saw him again. Jeremy and Irene took turns minding the store while a replacement manager was sought. None of the supervisors would be pressured into taking the job; they knew from Oliver what they could expect.
About three weeks after Oliver left, I came in for my purchasing shift and found Jeremy waiting for me in the back room. I knew it was serious when he didn’t greet me with the awkward fist-bump he ordinarily required of his male employees.
“You’ve seen the numbers,” he said. Business for the summer had fallen short of expectations, it was true, and he and Irene had decided to rein in payroll expenses. My purchaser position was being eliminated. Its responsibilities would be redistributed among the supervisors and the new manager, when one was found. In the meantime, I'd be going back to the regular $11 an hour (plus tips of course) associate position full-time.
Jeremy assured me I'd be first in the running for supervisor the next time there was an opening.
I told him it was fine, I was done, and if he’d expected the courtesy of two weeks’ notice, he shouldn’t have blindsided me like that.
“Well, that’s your choice,” he answered, trying not to look pleased. His payroll problem was solving itself.
I racked up credit card debt for a few months. Applied for entry-level museum jobs that might appreciate my art history degree. Aimed for some purchasing and administrative assistant gigs, and just for the hell of it, turned in a resume for a facilitator position at an after-school art program. Got a few interviews. All of them eventually told me they’d decided to go in a different direction. I finally got hired to bartend at Hops from Underground, a microbrewery on Fairmount.
I’m still there. The money’s okay, but it fluctuates. Hours are reasonable. I’m on their high-deductible health plan. There’s a coworker I’ve been dating. Sort of dating. You know how it goes. In this line of work you get so used to people coming and going that you learn not to get too attached. I walk past Avenue Brew a few times a week, but stopped peering in through the window when I didn't recognize the people behind the counter anymore.
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2023.06.03 15:37 Karmademon727 My boy just finished shedding and now he's a pretty orange pancake

My boy just finished shedding and now he's a pretty orange pancake submitted by Karmademon727 to BeardedDragons [link] [comments]


2023.06.03 15:37 jellybellyfofofelly Wet foods with only 1 animal protein for allergy kitty

Hello everyone! When I adopted my fur baby in February we knew he was allergic to chicken. Right now we are on Natural Balance LID Salmon and Green Pea dry food. We have since tried to incorporate an LID turkey wet food and have found that he is also allergic to that protein. I want to find a wet food that I can incorporate in his diet to increase his water intake and I also want it to be a different protein source other than fish since there are mixed reviews on fish for cats. He has had tuna and had no reaction to that ingredient so the Tiki Cat Aloha food I believe he would have no reaction to but again that is a fish based food. When I look for beef or other wet foods at the store they have also had chicken in the ingredients or they’ve had two animal protein sources. We know he is allergic to proteins specifically from the testing the vet did. I don’t want to introduce a food that has two different animal proteins in case he has a reaction because then I wouldn’t be able to tell what was the cause.
I appreciate any and all help as I try to give my fur baby the best I can.
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2023.06.03 15:37 LookAtThisGuyHere Rehiring staff

We recently had an incident where a cook stole booze and start drinking during service. When confronted, he lied about how the bartender poured it for him ( as Head Chef I had proof from the cameras). So I fired him. I felt bad that I fired him but I felt like ruining the trust I had in him and also I may not have been thinking clearly.
Cue next morning, I get a call from my exec chef asking what happened. I tell him the full story. He agrees that in any other situation with any other staff member, I would have been in the right. However. He tells me the whole situation with our cook (broken home and depression) he is the only bread winner in his family and living pay check to pay check.
My exec chef says that we should consider rehiring him but he would also fully support my decision to continue with the firing. I agreed with my exec chef and decided to give the cook a call. He profusely apologized and heard him crying in the phone begging for his job back. We agreed to hire him back.
This is where I gained even more respect for my exec chef. He said that we should give him a raise and give him food to take home once a week (a steak or chicken or some produce). I’m a firm believer in second chances and felt like he just needed break. After speaking to him privately in the office and telling him all this, he broke down. He apologized again and kept saying how stupid he was for not asking for help. My exec left me a message on my phone saying “we take care of our own”. I have never been more proud to work for my company and I have even more respect for my chef.
I know people here are getting burnt out from work or dealing with personal issues at home. Let me tell you, alcohol is not the solution. Seek help if you have too. You aren’t stronger by not getting help.
And for those in a leader ship role. Remember, you are managing people more than a restaurant.
This is what I learned from this whole shit show of a week.
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2023.06.03 15:37 LongIslandIcedTLover Can Wendy’s prevent me from using the app to order food?

I only order food when there’s an app deal, to save money. The last 2 months, every time I try to order food thru the app, it freezes up and won’t let me order. My iPhone also gets heated up when it’s frozen. I try to reinstall and install on numerous occasions and it still won’t work.
I have the newest iPhone and all my other apps work just fine. Not the Wendy’s app tho. Maybe they were losing money with me always using the deals on the app - idk. Maybe it’s just one store that’s preventing me from ordering there?
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2023.06.03 15:34 tejasdharmabum Wreath feeder problems anyone?

Hello birders! I’ve recently thought I would try out one of those peanuts wreath feeders for the Blue Jays. They found it pretty quickly but they seem to have trouble getting the peanuts out, and now I have a couple who come down, mess with the wreath for a bit to no avail and then yell to complain about the abysmal garden customer service!! 😂 Has anyone had this problem? Are the Jays down herr just lazier?! And can ayone advise a brand (Amazon if possible since I have some store credit to use) that doesn’t cause this problem? Thanks y’all!
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2023.06.03 15:31 John-Doe-Throwaway ~2.5 YOE with almost no callbacks (roast my resume)


https://preview.redd.it/xi9a1i9f2t3b1.png?width=814&format=png&auto=webp&s=aa19b0f35ecd8dfcb51df8d61116aa63705aaa97
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2023.06.03 15:28 foxnangelseo1 Industries in Lakshadweep - Business & Investment Opportunities

India's only coral islands chain With lagoon area of about 4,200 Sq. Kms, Territorial waters of 20,000 Sq. Km, Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of 4,00,000 Sq. Kms and coastal line of about 132 Kms, Lakshadweep Islands have a high scope for the fisheries sector The sea around Lakshadweep is rich in fishery resources and the main resource in the islands are Tuna. The estimated marine fishery potential resources in the sea around Lakshadweep is about one lack tones of tuna and tuna like fishes and about an equal quantity of Shark. The Islands have a high presence of food products, beverage manufacturing, furniture and wood-based products manufacturing MSME units. To accelerate digital connectivity to the islands, a submarine optical fiber cable has been laid between Kochi and 11 islands of Lakshadweep. Lakshadweep Islands are the first Union Territory to become 100% organic. Abundant production of coconuts also provides investment opportunities in coconut-based industries in Lakshadweep, such as coconut oil, coir yarn, etc. Small-scale service industries in Lakshadweep, such as engineering workshops, ITeS and auto-servicing, which do not pollute the lagoons, are best suited on the islands. Concurrently, the islands have a very small but significant presence of local handicrafts. Lakshadweep Islands, lying in the Arabian Sea, are a group of 36 islands. The islands are well connected with 10 minor ports and an airport in Agatti. The varied flora, fauna and coral reefs along the islands, attracts domestic and international tourists. The islands also offer a great destination for water sports. Ministry of Shipping has identified 10 locations in the UT to be developed in phase-I of its Lighthouse Tourism initiative.
Visit Now: https://www.foxnangel.com/events/lakshadweep-islands.html
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2023.06.03 15:26 beadfix82 Losing our favorite pharmacy.

The neighborhood i have lived in my entire life has always had a local pharmacy - when i was a kid, it was a mom and pop 'drug store' and pharmacy. Then it was Rite Aid for the longest time. Recently, it switched to Walgreens. We found out yesterday that the pharmacy will be closing at the end of the month. I don't think the store is - just the pharmacy. it's such a shame because there are so many that can walk to it. In addition - the pharmacists there have always been super great. When i've been sick and hubby has picked up various prescriptions for me - the pharmacist has always wished me well and suggested other things that can help. They're just super at Customer Service. But not profitable i guess.
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2023.06.03 15:26 TaxChick772 Shopping at Coles near closing time

Not sure if this happens at other Coles stores but I happened to go into the one in my area at 8.30pm this evening to get a few things. A staff member was walking around the shop with a trolley containing a ton of marked down food, offering it to shoppers. I picked up a pack of gourmet sausages, pack of chicken enchiladas and pack of barramundi fillets all at 40-70cents each. Three nights of dinners for under $2. Will def be going in late at night again to see if this is a regular thing.
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